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The dark side of recruiting is email. Lots and lots of email. And probably, the same types of email over and over again.

So, why not make things easier on yourself by creating templates for the messages you send all the time? We’ve got you covered with three of the most common recruiting emails—sending interview invitations, extending job offers, and nicely turning down candidates.

Of course, these are just the basics—you can (and should!) adapt them to your own voice, style, and culture, and in some cases, each recipient. (Don’t worry, we’ve got some tips on that, too.) After all, every communication you have with candidates is a great chance to show them what working with your company is all about.


1. Candidate Interview Template

Subject: Interview with [company name] for [job title] position

Hi [name],

Thanks for your application to [company name]. We were impressed by your background and would like to invite you to interview [at our office / via Skype / via phone] to tell you more about the position and get to know you better. [Details about the interview, including anything specific you would like candidates to know about.]

Please let me know which of the following times work for you, and I can send over a confirmation and details:

-[Day, Time 1]
-[Day, Time 2]
-[Day, Time 3]

Looking forward to meeting you,

[Your name]


Make it Your Own

  • Don’t be afraid to share details of the interview with candidates—for example, the names and titles of the people they’ll be meeting with, whether they should bring work samples, and the office dress code. The more prepared they are, the more likely they’ll be to impress you.
  • In the spirit of making things more efficient, try an automatic scheduler like Assistant.to, which allows candidates to book interviews during time slots you’ve selected. No back and forth required, and no risk of double booking!


2. Job Offer Email Template

Subject: Offer from [company name]

Hi [name],

We’ve all really enjoyed speaking with you and getting to know you over the course of the last few weeks. The team and I have been impressed with your background and would love to formally offer you a position as a [job title] at [company name].

We can offer you a [$X] annual base salary, plus [bonus and equity information, if applicable]. We offer [benefits details, relocation information] and [number of days] of vacation per year. We can discuss start dates based on what is possible on your end, but we’d be excited to have you start [ideal start date].

Please let me know if you have any questions or would like to discuss the offer in more detail. We would be thrilled to welcome you to the team!

[Your name]


Make it Your Own

  • Be specific about why you’re so excited for candidates to join your team. It’ll go a long way in making them feel welcome, especially if they’re deciding between multiple offers.
  • If you have beyond-the-basics benefits that you haven’t talked about with candidates during the interview process, now’s the time to do it! No, weekly massages and bagel Fridays probably won’t be the sole factor in someone’s decision, but sharing what makes your culture fun and unique can help get your prospective employee energized before Day 1.
  • It’s tempting to include a deadline for when candidates need to give you an answer, but that’s not always your best bet. “You don’t want your new employee to have a what-if feeling brewing before day one even rolls around,” says Muse career expert Lily Zhang. “Giving a job candidate ample time to make a decision means that you’ve done your part to ensure that he or she has weighed the pros and cons and made a decision with a clear head.”


3. Candidate Rejection Template

Subject: [Job title] application at [company name]

Hi [name],

Thank you so much for your application to [company name]. Unfortunately, we are not able to [offer you an interview / pass you onto the next round] at this time, as we are looking for someone with more experience in [skill or job requirement] for this role.

Please do not hesitate to keep in touch and reach out if we have another role you think could be a fit for in the future.

Best,

[Your name]


Make it Your Own

  • If this is someone who has gone through a few rounds of interviews, add a couple of lines on how nice it was to meet, and that it was a tough decision, to let him or her down more gently. Isn’t that how you’d want to be treated?
  • If you really do think the candidate might be a fit for a future opening, send that person a LinkedIn request and promise to let him or her know if when there’s another position available. If you already have an established relationship, it’ll make your next hiring process a whole lot smoother.



What other recruiting email templates will make your life easier? Let us know on Twitter.