APL Graduate Scholars Program - Hypersonics

Brief Job Description:

The ForceProjection Sector (FPS) at the Johns Hopkins University Applied PhysicsLaboratory (APL) is sponsoring anew collaborative research opportunity calledthe APL Graduate Scholars Program.Highly-qualified students pursuing PhDresearch aligned with the technical focus area (hypersonics) are invited toapply. Specific researchtopics of interest include novel methodologies in Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD), boundary-layer transition analysis, thermal/structural analysis,propulsion system design, Guidance Navigation & Control, and systemsengineering.

Selected PhD graduate studentswill work on site at APL for approximately 3 months in calendar year 2020 alongside an APL mentorwhile continuing their research to make progress towards their PhD. If selected, participation for the student in the GraduateScholars Program award is renewable for a total of 2 years (pending review) andallows flexibility to schedule the 3-month rotation at APL any time during theyear, nominally targeted to occur during the summer months.

This uniqueopportunity offers PhD graduate students relevant professional experience in tandem withtheir graduate education and also a mechanism for collaboration among APLexperts and leading academic research groups.

Academic Discipline Desired:

Current PhD students pursuing relevant degrees to the 2020 focus area (hypersonics) including Aerospace Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Applied Mathematics, or other relevant technical discipline



Required Skills:

  • Strong motivation
  • Ability to work independently
  • PhD research focus in hypersonics
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills



Desired Skills:
  • Research topics in novel methodologies in Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD), boundary-layer transition analysis, thermal/structural analysis,propulsion system design, Guidance Navigation & Control, and systemsengineering.
  • Ability to coordinate research collaboration between APL and your university research group




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